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The Epidemiology of Upper Extremity Firework-Related Injuries in the United States: A National Electronic Injury Surveillance Study.
Abhishek Jain, BA1, Sami P Tarabishy, MD1, Geoffrey Brown, MD1 and Fernando Herrera, MD2, (1)Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, (2)Division of Plastic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Plastic Surgery, Charleston, SC

Introduction: The purpose of this study is to examine the epidemiology of firework-related upper extremity injuries encountered in Emergency Departments (ED) in the United States for the years 2011-2020.
Methods: The Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC's) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was accessed for the years 2011 to 2020. Patients were identified using the product code 1313 (Fireworks) and selecting body parts consistent with upper extremity. Demographics, location, diagnosis, and disposition of each encounter were analyzed.
Results: A total of 1243 injuries were identified representing an estimated 47,235 upper extremity firework-related injuries treated in emergency departments within the United States from 2011 to 2020. The incidence remained consistent over the years. With respect to age, the most frequently injured age group was 10-19 years of age (344, 28%), followed by 20-29 years of age (308, 25%). Males were 3.8 times more likely to suffer an injury compared to female counterparts. Hand (664, 53%) and fingers (397, 32%) were the most commonly injured locations. Burns (784, 64%) were the most common diagnosis, followed by amputations (120, 10%), lacerations (111, 9%), and fractures (100, 8%). The majority of patients were treated and discharged (943, 76%), while (206, 17%) were treated and admitted, 69, 5% were treated and transferred to another facility. Females were more likely to be treated and discharged (233, 90%) than male counterparts (709, 72%) suggesting worse injuries.
Conclusion: Upper extremity firework related injuries appear to be consistent over the last decade. Males 10-19 years of age appear to suffer the highest injuries with hand and finger burns being the most frequent diagnosis. Increasing public awareness and improving safety laws for minors could assist in reducing these injuries.



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