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Prospective Comparision of Vitamin D Levels in Young Adults with and without Distal Radius Fracture
Rick Tosti1; Emmanuel Atiemo, MD1; John Jennings1; Alyssa Schaffer1; Asif M. Ilyas, MD2
1Temple University, Philadelphia, PA; 2Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA

Introduction: Vitamin D supplementation has recently been advocated to reduce fracture risk in young adults with deficiency. The purposes of this study were to compare the vitamin D levels of young adults with low energy distal radius fractures to levels of healthy individuals without a history of fracture and to identify a possible correlation between fracture severity and vitamin D levels.
Methods: A prospective study was performed at an urban, level I academic trauma center in the northeastern region of the United States from 2011-2012. All subjects were aged 18-45 years. Study participants sustained a distal radius fracture as a result of a fall from standing height. Healthy age-gender matched controls without a history of fracture served as a comparison. Vitamin D deficiency was classified by the guidelines recommended by the Institute of Medicine. Fracture severity was assessed with the AO/ASIF classification system. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between vitamin D level and fracture severity, which was classified by the AO/ASIF system.
Results: A total of 15 distal radius fractures and 67 healthy controls met the inclusion criteria. The overall range of 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 7.0-50.2 ng/mL, and the average measurement was 22.4 ng/mL in the control group and 21.4 ng/mL in the study group; these differences were not statistically different (p=0.97). In patients who sustained a distal radius fracture, vitamin D levels were categorized as the following: deficient in 13.3%, insufficient in 46.6%, and adequate in 40.0%. These proportions were also not significantly different than those of the control subjects. No significant correlations were found between fracture severity and vitamin D level.
Conclusions: Although 60% of those who sustained a distal radius fracture were considered vitamin D deficient or insufficient by the current standards, the mean serum value was not statistically different than that of the control group. Fracture severity and vitamin D level did not correlate. Vitamin D supplementation in otherwise healthy young adults would not likely reduce the short-term risk of low energy fracture.
Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study


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